Interesting Research on Safety – Things You Probably Never Knew

Safety First! In order to achieve different objectives, different countries around the world opt to adopt the UN recommended Globally Harmonized System of classification and labeling of chemicals. Knowing that most chemicals can be dangerous, the aim of the UN recommended Globally Harmonized System of classification and labeling of chemicals is to protect the safety of the workers when it comes to their health since they are involved in different process, transportation and handling of chemicals. The safety of the environment is also one of the main concerns of the UN recommended Globally Harmonized System of classification and labeling of chemicals aside from the safety of the workers. If the system of classification of chemicals is unified well, then hazard levels can easily be identified. Each countries experience different process and system of categorization, other countries have various classification systems while others don’t have, which led to confusion and risk. The development of the UN recommended Globally Harmonized System of classification and labeling of chemicals came from the study which aimed to unify and ensure the level of protection. The classification process takes into consideration the intrinsically hazardous properties of single chemicals and their formulation as well as reactivity with air, water and other chemicals besides impact when released into the environment. Processing, storage and transportation are all part of the different chains wherein the GHS SDS are involved since they were developed in a structured way. Over the years GHS underwent various revisions and countries accepted one or the other besides introducing their own norms. One of the quirks of the SDS is that disclosure of hazard must be made in full but without compromising confidential information of proprietary formulations. A key feature is that of training employees in the use of SDS and appropriate procedures in relation to the chemicals they handle and this training included interpretation of the safety data sheets and the safety labels. Then there are further recommendations on implementation. For example, a sealed container of chemicals with GHS labels might be received by some improper – distributor. It is their duty to ensure that the labels remain intact. Another example is that a manufacturer must maintain the data sheets and make it readily available to employees handling the chemicals and further label secondary containers if ever the manufacturer received a sealed container but is subsequently open.
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There are surprising exceptions and anomalies too that those involved in the handling of hazardous chemicals should know. GHS does not specify a uniform test method but relies on tests conducted by internationally accepted test agencies such as OECD or relies on WHO data in regards to health and environmental hazards.Lessons Learned from Years with Resources